Nothing found for Btvshalom Org Resources Road_Map Shtml

This is somewhat embarrassing, isn’t it?

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.







Nothing found for Btvshalom Org Resources Road_Map Shtml

This is somewhat embarrassing, isn’t it?

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.







Brit Tzedek v'Shalom

Jewish Alliance for Justice and Peace


Educational Resources

The Road Map

The Road Map is a peace plan proposed by the Madrid Quartet (the United States, United Nations, European Union and Russia) at the Foreign Minister's Meeting in Madrid, Spain on April 10, 2002. The proposal is a multi-phase process designed to return to the "Land for Peace" concept that is at the core of the Oslo peace process and in line with the relevant UN Security Council resolutions 242 [read UN resolution 242]and 338 [read UN resolution 338]. The "Road Map" calls for unequivocal Palestinian Authority action to end violence and terrorism against Israel, a simultaneous Israeli freeze on all settlement expansion (including natural growth) and an immediate removal of recently established Israeli settlements. The process is intended to lead to the establishment of a Palestinian state and a comprehensive peace settlement between Israelis and Palestinians by 2005.

The European Union, particularly British Prime Minister Tony Blair and Spanish Foreign Minister Javier Solana, has enthusiastically called for the release of the plan, as have UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan and the Russian government. Moreover, according to an April 2003 poll, the majority of Israelis and Palestinians support the Road Map. However, the formal release of the plan has been delayed several times at the behest of the Bush administration, which has offered a variety of amendments in an attempt to allay the objections of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), the renowned pro-Israel lobby. The Sharon government is still raising objections to the peace plan. The incoming Palestinian Prime Minister, Abu Mazen, has been supportive.

The US government offically released the Road Map on April 30, 2003. Read the text of the Roadmap

Below are links to articles offering an overview of the Road Map, current policy statements, public opinion data, and related news and opinion articles.

GENERAL INFORMATION ON THE ROAD MAP
Americans for Peace Now: Resource Sheet - The Road Map (April 7, 2003)
This document provides an excellent, detailed description of the proposed Road Map.
[read article] (Opens in Adobe Acrobat)

Questions and Answers on the Roadmap, Israel Policy Forum, (April 2003)
This excellent document answers some of the most commonly asked questions about the Road Map.
[read Q and A]

PUBLIC OPINION POLL ON THE ROAD MAP
Joint Israel-Palestinian Press Release
This opinion poll released 3/14/03 by the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research (PSR) in Ramallah and the Harry S. Truman Research Institute for the Advancement of Peace shows stable majorities of the Israeli and Palestinian public support the Quartet's roadmap.
[read article]

RECENT ARTICLES ON THE ROADMAP
U.S.-Israel Differences Deepen on Peace 'Map': Rice Outlines 'Parallel' Steps in D.C. Speech by Ori Nir, Forward, April 18, 2003
The US administration is pushing for a "parallel" approach in which Israel and the Palestinians act simultaneously; the Sharon government is seeking a "sequential" approach in which Israel will act only after the Palestinians have made concessions.
[read article]

Weisglass Takes Road Map Doubts to White House by Nathan Guttman, Ha'aretz, April 15, 2003
The US did not accept many objections to the Road Map raised by Dov Weinglass, the Israeli Prime Minister's Bureau Chief, during his visit to Washington. The administration wants Israel to ease restrictions on Palestinian freedom of movement to sure up the political position of the new Palestinian government.
[read article]

PM: 'Iraq war created an opportunity with the Palestinians we can't miss', Ha'aretz, April 13, 2003 During a lengthy interview Sharon expressed a willingness to make" painful concessions" and evacuate some Israeli settlements. However, he also insisted that the Palestinians must drop their demand for "A Right of Return" as a precondition for resuming peace talks.
[read article]

EDITORIALS/ANALYSES OF THE ROAD MAP
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly in the Roadmap to Palestinian-Israeli Peace, by Gidon D. Remba, April 21, 2003
The President of Chicago Peace Now critiques the Road Map by answering the question, "Should the Jewish peace camp and others who seek a just peace lend their support to such a program-or they should they seek to replace it in toto?".
[read article]

Mideast Peace: Follow the Map by Robert Strauss, former Middle East Envoy, Washington Post, April 15, 2003
A former US Ambassador urges the Bush administration to push ahead with the Road Map, because it's "a chance to promote all of our interests simultaneously with both our Israel and our Arab friends."
[read article]

The Clock is Ticking by Yossi Beilin, Ha'aretz, April 12, 2003
Former Knesset Member Yossi Beilin argues that the Sharon government is trying to undermine the Road Map, because it's not willing to accept a Palestinian state on most of the West Bank. He argues that Israel can strengthen Palestinian moderates by implementing the Road Map.
[read article]

Embracing the Roadmap to Kill It by M.J. Rosenberg, Israel Policy Forum, April 4, 2003
Rosenberg argues that Israel's "friends" in Congress (in response to AIPAC's lobbying efforts) are attempting to undermine the Road Map by trying to change the intent. He bemoans the fact that Israel's so-called "friends" are actually undermining this important opportunity to help Israel achieve peace.
[read article]

Analysis: Israel's 'Road Map' Manoeuvres by James Reynolds, BBC, March 31, 2003.
A British correspondent analyzes how Sharon may react to and attempt to avoid implementing the Road Map. British Prime Minister wants the Road Map implemented, but the Bush administration may be more willing to let it wither away like so many previous peace plans.
[read article]

The Battle for Washington by David Landau, Ha'aretz, March 31, 2003.
Landau explains how AIPAC is trying to use their influence on Capitol Hill to pressure the Bush administration to further water down the Road Map and thus make it easier for Israel to avoid agreeing to the creation of a Palestinian state.
[read article]

The Roadmap: Israel's Best Opportunity by M.J. Rosenberg, Israel Policy Forum, March 28, 2003
Rosenberg argues that the Roa Map is Israel's best chance to reach a peace settlement with the Palestinians. He also argues that it is a mistake for some friends of Israel to attempt to undermine this peace plan.
[read article]

Road Map to a Permanent Two-State Solution to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Council on Foreign Relations, February, 2003
A panel of the influential Council of Foreign Relations, including many former policymakers, makes very explicit recommendations to the Bush administration on what should be included in its Road Map. They emphasize that the Palestinians must make a 100% effort to end violence and the Israelis must unconditionally end settlement expansion.
[read article]

Swing Your Partner By M.J. Rosenberg, Israel Policy Forum, January 17, 2003
Rosenberg deconstructs the oft-heard and rarely-refuted argument that "Israel lacks a partner for peace" by explaining that one obviously makes peace with its adversaries, not with its partners. Lack of a "partner" is no barrier to restarting the peace process and implementing the Road Map.
[read article]

Israel is Blocking the Road to Peace by Saeb Erekat, Financial Times, January 13, 2003
The chief Palestinian negotiator explains how the Sharon government has been putting roadblocks in the path of a return to continued peace negotiations.
[read article]

Roadblocks on the Path to Peace by Gareth Evans & Robert Malley, New York Times, Oct 24, 2002
An explanation of why the Bush Administration "Roadmap" is unlikely to bring an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement anytime soon, because it focuses only on incremental steps and puts final status issues off or another 3 years.
[read article]

KEY SPEECHES BY US ADMINISTRATION ON THE ROADMAP

Bush Administration to Jews: 'Road Map' must move ahead by Matthew E. Berger, JTA, March 31, 2003 [read article]

As Palestinian Violence Subsides, Israel must Stop Building Settlements, Powell Says by Steven R. Weisman, New York Times, March 31, 2003
[read article]

Secretary Colin Powell's Speech to AIPAC - March 30, 2003
Secretary of State Colin Powell strongly defended the Quartet's Road Map to a Middle East peace in his speech to the American-Israel Public Affairs Committee's (AIPAC's) National Policy Conference. He told the members of the powerful pro-Israel lobby that Israel must end its settlement expansion in the West Bank. [read article]

President George W. Bush - March 14, 2003
President Bush announced that as soon as the new Palestinian Prime Minister is confirmed "the road map for peace will be given to the Palestinians and the Israelis. This road map will set forth a sequence of steps toward the goals I set out on June 24th, 2002, goals shared by all the parties".
[read article]

President George W. Bush Speech - June 24, 2002
Last June, President Bush laid out his basic principles for a Middle East peace. This speech has become the basis for the current Road Map.
[read article]

Colin Powell Speech at the University of Louisville - Nov 19, 2001
Powell laid the groundwork for the Road Map in a major foreign policy address not long after September 11.
[read article]

• Prepared by the Brit Tzedek v Shalom Education and Advocacy Committees
Nothing found for Btvshalom Org Resources Road_Map Shtml
Contact

This is somewhat embarrassing, isn’t it?

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.