Ideas Ahead Of The Curve (WHICH MAY NOT EVER BE ADOPTED BY OFFICIAL DIPLOMACY)
and
A Security Fence or a Dangerous Wall?: Exploring the Political and Moral Implications of Israel's Construction Project
Stephen P. Cohen
Dr. Stephen P. Cohen is a leader in the practice and theory of unofficial diplomacy know as Track Two Diplomacy. Since 1975 when he first traveled to Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon and the Palestinian areas as part of a team of university professors, he has pioneered behind the scenes efforts in bringing Arabs and Israelis together. Having developed relationships with leaders and decision makers for more than twenty-five years, he brings original ideas and approaches to advancing peace and peaceful relations to leaders of Israel, the Palestinians and the Arabs, as well as top American officials.

Dr. Cohen founded the Institute for Middle East Peace and Development in 1979 to serve as a facilitator and private intermediary in peace-making and peace-building and has served as its President ever since. He is the National Scholar of Israel Policy Forum and, in the last years,he has been a visiting professor at Princeton University and Lehigh University.

Dr. Cohen has developed close relations with Israeli leaders from all parties, Labor and Likud, religious and secular, and with Arab heads of state, foreign ministers, and leading figures in almost every state in the Arab world including the deceased leaders, King Hussein, King Hassan and President Assad as well as the current leader of Egypt President Mubarak, and the new successors of key states such as Lebanon, Syria, Algeria, Yemen and the Gulf States.Over the years, Dr. Cohen has worked with some of the leading figures in the American Jewish community.

Dr. Cohen is a widely quoted Middle East expert in the New York Times and other publications. He comments regularly on Middle East affairs on radio, television and in newspapers. He has spoken often in meetings of the General Assembly of the Jewish Federations and other Jewish audiences, in Arab meetings and in key venues of discussion of Middle East affairs such as the Council on Foreign Relations. His advice and counsel are sought by government and foreign policy leaders in the United States, Israel and many other countries.

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